NaClhv

Theology, philosophy, science, math, and random other things
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

From "Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri" (1999)

As the Americans learned so painfully in Earth's final century, free flow of information is the only safeguard against tyranny. The once-chained people whose leaders at last lose their grip on information flow will soon burst with freedom and vitality, but the free nation gradually constricting its grip on public discourse has begun its rapid […]

The Dividing Moment

The frozen blizzard was standing still in the air, allowing Anna to glance back at Kristoff one last time. But she quickly turned around, for her mind was already made up. Elsa was her sister! She was in danger! She had to go to her! Anna felt the icy curse on her heart starting to burst out. Her limbs were becoming rigid and numb. She knew she was in imminent danger of freezing completely. But none of it mattered. The choice to protect Elsa wasn't really hers to make; her heart had made the choice for her a long time ago - perhaps when their parents died, or perhaps back in their childhood.

Fuller house: a short review

Ultimately, the aim of art is to reflect truth, and "Fuller House" does so in an utterly unique way. Its truth echoes back to us through time and history. It's encoded into the changing cultures and issues discussed in and around the show. And it's etched into reality itself, through the lives of its incredibly human and relatable actors.

Probably the last Frozen II post - this time a meme:

For real though, as I explain in these posts:A systematic mythology of the "Frozen" universeThe Gospel according to Frozen II (or, why Elsa is Jesus) You may next want to read: A systematic mythology of the "Frozen" universeThe Gospel according to Frozen II (or, why Elsa is Jesus)Another post, from the table of contents

The Gospel according to Frozen II (or, why Elsa is Jesus)

At that deepest level - at the very heart of the movie - is the Christ-figure of the story. This is the character we really need to understand to grasp the true essence of the film. For everything about Frozen II - its whole world and plot - is built from the ground up with a singular purpose, to place this Christ-figure character at the very center of the story.

A systematic mythology of the "Frozen" universe

There is a being of great power "behind" or "within" Ahtohallan - someone who possesses an incredible degree of consciousness, intellect, and agency, has clear moral priorities and goals, and is responsible for most of the key plot events in the movie. In other words, "Ahtohallan" is not just a place. It - or the being behind it - is something more like "God".

How to think about the future

This post is a consolidation of a whole series of posts into one post. It's fairly long. Click on the following entries in the table of contents below to jump directly there: The future is completely unpredictable No, really, the future is COMPLETELY unpredictable The future will be like the past, and therefore "predictable" The […]

How to think about the future (Part 1)

It turns out that the future is completely unpredictable. That may seem like a trivial statement. But most people have no idea just how true it is. A simple physics calculation may shed some light on this subject. In the film franchise "Back to the Future", the main characters Marty McFly and Doctor "Doc" Emmett […]

The universe is an MMO, and God is the game designer.

God has been compared to many things. The Bible itself calls him an Author. He has also been called the Great Bridge Builder, and the Great Architect of the Universe. In an effort to express God's supreme artistry and power as the Creator, we humans have always compared him to the maker of whatever was […]

Time spent on video games: worthwhile or wasteful?

Like many of you, I've been playing video games since my childhood. I grew up hearing that they were only a waste of time, but I always knew that was wrong. There are many games that I'm glad to have played - ones that taught me new things, gave me new experiences, and enriched my life. But on the other hand, video game addiction is clearly a real phenomena that many of us have observed or even experienced firsthand. Even without going to that extreme, I think we can all admit that we've wasted some time playing video games.
1 2